Posts in "Illustration" Category

Astounding Space Thrills 20th Anniversary Cover

Astounding Space Thrills 2018 cover

Astounding Space Thrills: The Codex Reckoning and Aspects of IronThis year marks the 20th anniversary of my webcomic and comic series Astounding Space Thrills. To celebrate, I’m prepping and re-releasing the original comics with a 20th anniversary Omnibus Kickstarter planned for later this year (please sign up for my email list if you want to be alerted when the Kickstarter goes live).

Here’s a look at the cover for the new collection of Astounding Space Thrills: The Codex Reckoning and Aspects of Iron. The figure and textures were painted in Procreate with vector-drawn elements imported from Photoshop. I’m really happy with how it turned out.

This collection reprints the first three black-and-white issues of Astounding Space Thrills.

Astounding Space Thrills 2018 cover

The remastered web series can be read here (with updated installments on Tuesdays and Thursdays).

You can read about the original 1998 cover collaboration with Jim Steranko here.

— Steve

How To Draw Chain Mail

Chain Mail Tutorial

Or more specifically… how I draw chain mail in my webcomic The Middle Age.

Chain Mail TutorialI get a lot of comments and questions asking how I create the chain mail texture in The Middle Age. The hero of the story, Sir Quimp, wears armor that looks sort of like chain mail or banded mail armor. Artist friends have presumed it’s a special brush or a texture map or something computery.

But it’s all drawn by hand, one link at a time. And it might look complicated but it’s not.

Now, I work on an iPad Pro using the Procreate App but this approach works with any software and even works with traditional pen-and-ink tools.

Chain Mail Tutorial - Step 1Step 1: Start by drawing a grid on the form which will act as a guide for your texture. Keep in mind the shape, perspective, folds and bends. It should look 3-D. If it looks like graph-paper, the pattern will look flat. But it doesn’t need to be perfect. We’re just using it as reference and we’ll erase it when we’re done. In the example, you can see mine in light blue. Extra tip: I draw my guides on a separate layer to make them easy to hide and delete.

Chain Mail Tutorial - Step 2Step 2: Now let’s start the pattern. Somewhere around the two-thirds point on the side where light is coming from (not down the middle), draw small, single, evenly-spaced tick marks. Again, they don’t need to be perfectly spaced or identical. Do your best and that’ll be fine. Remember that this is armor wrapping a living figure, not a robot, and we expect variations. Those variations make the figure feel more alive. Extra tip: I make the texture extend a little bit beyond the shape – you can see it overlapping the cape – this helps me keep the pattern and spacing consistent. I erase the overlapping bits when I’m done.

Chain Mail Tutorial - Step 3Step 3: Between each one of those tick marks, draw two tick marks next to each other. Extra tip: The longer each tick mark, the wider each chain segment will seem later.

Chain Mail Tutorial - Step 4Step 4: Between each of the double-tick marks, draw three tick marks next to each other. You can see where I’m going with this.

Chain Mail Tutorial - Step 5Step 5: Between each of the triple-tick marks, draw four ticks marks next to each other.

Chain Mail Tutorial - Step 6And so on… until you run out of room. Always increase the number of tick marks per row and you’ll get the proper effect. Then do the same thing in the other direction. Extra tip: don’t draw all the way to the shape’s outline on one side to give a hint of really-bright side lighting.

If you want to see how other cartoonists handled drawing armor textures, I recommend checking out the work of Hal Foster, Wally Wood, Russ Manning, and David Petersen.

Here’s a video clip of my approach…

You can see plenty of examples in my webcomic The Middle Age.

Scroll down to ask any questions or leave a comment. If you’d like to see more tutorials like this one, please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon.

— Steve @theSteveConley

Dystopian Retro Posters

Retro Print: Universe

This looks back a some of the retro images I created in 2013 as part of the BLOOP webcomic. These were created as set decorations for the villain’s office – which I wanted to make as depressing as possible.

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